How often do you need to test and tag?

Retest Intervals

Retest Intervals for test and tag inspections? Below you'll find a calculator to advise what retest interval might apply to appliances, tools and leads in a variety of locations, situations and uses. This can be confusing as an extension lead used on a building site would have a retest interval of three months. The same lead used in a workshop would be tested and tagged for retest in six months. If it was being used in a staff cafe , a yearly retest interval would be appropriate, but move it to your Computer Server Room and a 60 month retest interval could be acceptable.


For more detail buy a copy of AS/NZS3760:201, or give us a call at Port  Test and Tag. But for a quick guide to possible retest intervals, use our handy Retest Interval calculator for test and tag inspections- just click on the type of equipment in the center of the calculator and the retest interval suggested in Table 4 of AS/NZS3760:2010 will be given in months.

PATT Retest interval calculator

Do I need to test and tag new equipment?

The electrical test and tag standard is a joint Australia and New Zealand, as such there are subtle differences between what happens in the Western Islands of New Zealand (also known as Australia) and what happens in New Zealand,


In Australia, new electrical appliances receive a visual inspection and a "new to service" tag is fitted to the item, the appliance is then fully tested during the next round of testing.


In New Zealand, a new appliance shall be inspected, tested and tagged on entry to service, the standard goes on to mention that if the item is supplied via an electrically safe RCD, or Portable RCD which has a current tag. However Electrical Regulation 26 states in part  that where items have been tested and tagged to AS/NZS3760:2010, they will be "deemed to be electrically safe"


Our advice, test and tag any new item fully and correctly to AS/NZS3760:2010. RCD's are good, but they don't always operate correctly, and there are a number of instances that they will not protect a user that comes into contact with a live component. If your test and tag service talks about "new to service" tags,might be time to give us a call.


Note: for items on a building site, to get to deemed safe, all items will be tested and tagged to the requirements of AS/NZS3012:2010 (see Electrical Safety Regulation 25)  

new to service tag these don't apply in New Zealand

new to service tag these don't apply in New Zealand

Test and tag process

Visual Examination

The first step of  test and tag is the visual inspection,  Clause 2.3.2 of  AS/NZS 3760  lists all the equipment checks to be made by visual and hands on inspection.


90% of Failed Items will be detected by visually examining the item. This must be done completely, over the entire lead, plug, socket connector, appliance case- if any part can't be seen, it can't be passed. To perform a visual examination, the item under test must be turned off and unplugged. 


If any safety features have been removed, guards and interlocks disabled or modified to  reduce their effectiveness, the item fails a test and tag inspection.


Regard must be paid to New Zealand jurisdictional requirements , this is the part that many other service providers and some in house "competent persons" get wrong. 


They have little understanding of the requirements of the electrical test and tag standard AS/NZS 3760:2010, no understanding of AS/NZS 3012:2010 (if they are testing builders tools and leads) and no knowledge of the other standards and Electrical  Safety Regulations requirements that apply to electrical appliances being sold, or used in New Zealand.


When you use our test and tag service, you can be sure we do.



Examples of visual test fails for test and tag inspection

Examples of visual test fails for test and tag inspection

Visual Inspection For Test and tag - Plug Rating

What size plug must an appliance being tested have?

The rating calculator below assumes that the device under test is 230/240 volts, find the items rating plate and select the appropriate line from the drop down menu, the plug rating will be given in the bottom line of the calculator - getting this part right of the visual test is frequently missed by both "competent persons' and qualified test and taggers. 


It is a legal requirement in New Zealand, that appliances sold and used here are fitted with a rating plate (Electrical Safety Regulation  23) that the voltage is marked on that rating plate and is equal to, or exceeds New Zealand's Standard Voltage of 230V 50Hz and that the plug fitted to the device must have a rating that equals or exceeds the rating on the devices rating plate.


The rating calculator below assumes that the device under test is 230/240 volts, find the items rating plate and select the appropriate line from the drop down menu, the plug rating will be given in the bottom line of the calculator - getting this part right of the visual test is frequently missed by both "competent" and qualified taggers - call us if you are unsure 

Identifying appliance rating as a part of visual inspection for test and tag

Identifying appliance rating as a part of visual inspection for test and tag

Plug Rating calculator for test and tag inspection